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Call for Papers and Copy Editors

Call for Papers for Special Issue 
AFRICANA QUEER SOCIAL JUSTICE: POLITICS, THEORY AND ACTIVISM

The Special Issue

About the Special Issue

 

There is a state of emergency for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA+) people not only in the U.S, but within the larger African world.  In the U.S., Republican state and federal politicians continue to propose white, heteropatriarchal, and capitalist-based legislation that has the potential to impact the life chances and well-being of Africana queer adults and youth. Within the last two years, conservative state politicians have proposed over 400 anti-LGBTQIA+ bills. From proposing bills that challenge gender affirming health care to securing legislation that bans teaching about the lives and history of queer folks to elementary and middle school students, conservative legislators are waging war on freedoms of Africana LGBTQIA+ people. Africana folks in the Caribbean face similar measures. In at least six countries in the African Caribbean, it is still illegal for men to have sex with other men and, if convicted, one must serve a lengthy jail sentence. These colonial era derived laws also continue to impact the life chances of LGBTQIA+ folks living in certain African countries. On the continent, anti-LGBTQIA+ laws are rampant, leaving many African queer folks to live under the threat of severe discrimination, violence, and punishment. While to date, thirty-three African countries have anti-LGBTQIA+ laws, the most shocking pieces of legislation have come out of Mauritania, northern Nigeria, and Uganda, according to the Human Rights Watch, where one could possibly receive the death penalty for same-sex acts. What does justice look like living under these conservative governments? How can we reimagine resistance to these measures? How do we create safety and joy as we are confronted with heteropatriarchal and colonial legislation?

 

The proposed special issue explores the definition and contours of Africana Queer Social Justice in the context of building inclusive democracies and governance structures, and a just world. By Africana, we mean the experiences of homeland African people and Africans in North and South America, the Caribbean, Europe and elsewhere; that is, wherever African people, and their descendants, exist in the world. This issue seeks to build upon the radical theories and activism of writers such as Audre Lorde, Cheryl Clarke, and Marquis Bey; political scientist, Cathy J. Cohen; sociologists, Patricia Hill Collins and Juan Battle; theologians, Kelly Brown Douglas and Horace Griffith; and African sexuality studies scholar, Sylvia Tamale, just to name a few, to engage the following topics*:

 

*The lists of scholars (above) and topics (below) are not exhaustive. We welcome all submissions concerned with Africana queer social justice.  

 

Africana queer social justice - definitions, perspectives, and approaches

Institutional /public policy and protections

Anti-LGBTQIA+ legislation

Anti-LGBTQIA+ colonial legacies/heteropatriarchy/white supremacy

Programming for queer youth and adults (Basic needs support, housing, healthcare etc.)

LGBTQIA+ activism

Sexual politics

Gender identity

Black radical tradition and resistance

Womanist theology as activism

LGBTQIA+ resistance narratives, histories, autoethnographies

Africana queer theory as activism

Africana feminist approaches to Africana queer social justice

Queer theology as activism

Spirituality and radical space holding  

Queer film and media as social justice

LGBTQIA+ arts as activism

Intersections of disability studies and Africana queer theory

Archival preservation and curation of queer representation as activism

 

In this special issue, we warmly invite and encourage interdisciplinary and collaborative submissions. We encourage scholars to embrace the opportunity to contribute diverse perspectives, enriching the dialogue across academic disciplines, and amplifying the depth of our exploration into critical issues surrounding Africana Queer Social Justice. We encourage longer essays and research articles, as well as oral histories, institutional reports, book reviews, commentaries, artwork, and creative works such as poetry, short stories, and narratives. Essays, research articles, reports, and oral histories/interviews should not exceed 10,000 words; review essays, film reviews, and commentaries should not exceed 3,000 words; and book reviews should not exceed 1500 words. The length and medium of all creative work will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

 

Special Issue Editors

Shameka Cathey (she/they) is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Tennessee State University in Nashville.  Cathey earned a doctorate in Political Science from Howard University, and holds graduate degrees in Public Policy and Administration and Divinity. Their scholarship focuses on the areas of African American Political thought, social justice, and the politics of Black LGBTQIA+ folx.  As a scholar-activist, Cathey works in partnership with students, colleagues, and community advocates to uplift the freedom, affirmation, and celebration of all diverse identities. They serve as the Vice Chair of the LGBTQ+ Caucus for the National Conference of Black Political Scientists and on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Africana Studies. 

 

Jerome Hunt (he/him/his) is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Long Beach City College in Long Beach, California. Hunt received his BA in Political Science and Masters of Administration with a concentration in Public Administration from West Chester University of Pennsylvania. He received his doctorate in American Government and Political Behavior and Black Politics from Howard University. He is a scholar advocate whose research focuses on Black leadership in a “post-racial” America and socioeconomic/social justice issues affecting the Black community and Black LGBTQIA+ folx. Jerome serves as the Chair of the LGBTQ+ Caucus for the National Conference of Black Political Scientists and is a member of the Committee on the Status of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Individuals for the American Political Science Association. 

 

For inquiries, please contact Shameka Cathey and Jerome Hunt at: joafst@gmail.com.

Submission Guidelines

Manuscripts should be submitted as a Microsoft Word document, double spaced, written in Times New Roman, size 12 font, and adhere to the most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style, APA Publication Manual, or MLA Handbook in terms of format and citation.

For this special issue, the editors are asking for authors to submit a 300 to 400 word abstract for initial consideration before submitting a longer work. The abstract should include the tentative title, author(s), affiliation(s), type of submission, detailed summary of the proposed submission, and representative sources. Abstracts are due no later than March 15, 2024, and decisions on acceptance will occur no later than April 1, 2024.

Once abstracts are accepted by the editors, completed submissions are due no later than June 15, 2024, and should adhere to the guidelines stated above including a title page with title of submission and type of submission (research article, interview etc.), name of author(s), affiliation(s), and email(s).

 

Submission Timeline:

Abstracts Due: March 15, 2024

Notification of Acceptance: April 1, 2024

Completed Submission Due: June 15, 2024

Publication: Fall 2024

All abstracts and submissions should be uploaded to the submissions page on the  journal website at  https://www.journalofafricanastudies.com/submissions.

For inquiries, please contact us here.

Call for Papers for Special Issue 
MAA KHERU: HONORING OUR ANCESTORS’ CONTRIBUTIONS TO AFRICANA STUDIES

The Special Issue

Over the past few years, countless elders who have contributed to the development of Africana/Black Studies have transitioned to the ancestral plane. These scholar/activists were pivotal in the creation and establishment of the discipline, both inside and outside the academy, and their loss can be felt throughout the entire African world. They have left behind foundational theories, histories, policies, narratives, performances, organizations, paradigms, and other discourses about struggle and freedom, and solutions for making a more humane world. Current and emerging Africana/Black Studies scholar/activists can build upon their work as we take Africana/Black Studies into the future. This special issue is, therefore, dedicated to the ancestors: their work, their legacy, and their influence on Africana/Black Studies; Black communities; the African world; the academy; on us, personally; and more.  

We encourage longer essays and research articles, as well as oral histories, institutional reports, book reviews, commentaries, artwork, and creative works such as poetry, short stories, and narratives. Essays, research articles, reports, and oral histories/interviews should not exceed 10,000 words; review essays, film reviews, and commentaries should not exceed 3,000 words; and book reviews should not exceed 1500 words. The length and medium of all creative work will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

The following are ancestors who could be included (but, are not limited to): 

 

Dr. bell hooks 

Dr. James E. Turner 

Dr. Kariamu Welsh 

Dr. James H. Bracey, Jr. 

Dr. James L. Conyers 

Dr. Runoko Rashidi 

Dr. Terry Kershaw 

Dr. Eileen Jackson Southern 

Prof. Ama Ata Aidoo

Dr. Manning Marable

Dr. Leith Mullings

Submission Guidelines

Manuscripts should be submitted as a Microsoft Word document, double spaced, written in Times New Roman, size 12 font, and adhere to the most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style, APA Publication Manual, or MLA Handbook in terms of format and citation. 

​ 

For this special issue, the editors are asking for authors to submit a 300 to 400 word abstract for initial consideration before submitting a longer work. The abstract should include the tentative title, author(s), affiliation(s), type of submission, detailed summary of the proposed submission, and representative sources. Abstracts are due no later than February 29, 2024, and decisions on acceptance will occur no later than March 15, 2024. 

​ 

Once abstracts are accepted by the editors, completed submissions are due no later than June 15, 2024, and should adhere to the guidelines stated above including a title page with title of submission and type of submission (research article, interview etc.), name of author(s), affiliation(s), and email(s). 

Submission Timeline: 

Abstracts Due: February 29, 2024 

Notification of Acceptance: March 15, 2024 

Completed Submission Due: June 15, 2024 

Publication: Summer 2024 (August 2024) 

​ 

All abstracts and submissions should be uploaded to the Submissions page on the  journal website at https://www.journalofafricanastudies.com/submissions

​ 

For inquiries, please contact us here.

Open Call for Special Editions

The Journal of Africana Studies intentionally positions itself as an inclusive and affirming discipline-based African-centered entity. Pan-African in scope, it simultaneously provides intellectual space for discourse about community social justice activist work and liberation struggles on the continent and within African world communities. Timely and radical intellectual research and creative pieces on the prison industrial complex; Africana/Black digital humanities; Africana genders and sexualities and Africana queer theory; the Black radical tradition; political prisoners; Africana/Black Psychology; mental health, nutrition, and holistic health; the African/Black Aesthetic; Africana spiritual philosophy; Black liberation theology; and Afrofuturism and Afropessimism are, therefore, welcome. 

 

If scholars, independent authors, writers, activists, and artists would like to edit a special edition that reflects the aim and scope of the journal, please submit a 500-word abstract summarizing the purpose of the special edition, including the tentative title, guest editor(s) of the proposed special edition, affiliation(s), and email(s) of the guest editor(s).

 

All abstracts should be uploaded in the Submissions form here.

General Submission Guidelines

Siyabonana encourages longer essays and research articles, as well as oral histories, institutional reports, book reviews, commentaries, and creative works. Essays, research articles, reports, and oral histories/interviews should not exceed 10,000 words; review essays, film reviews, and commentaries should not exceed 3,000 words; and book reviews should not exceed 1700 words. The length of all creative work will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

Manuscripts should be submitted as a Microsoft Word document, double spaced, written in Times New Roman, size 12 font, and adhere to the most recent edition of the Chicago Manual of Style, APA Publication Manual, or MLA Handbook in terms of format and citation.

At the top of your submission, please include the following information in this order:

  1. Title of article (in Bold)

  2. Author’s first name and last name, highest degree (ex.  Kwame Martin, Ph.D.)

  3. Email address

  4. Academic title (ex. Associate Professor of Sociology)

  5. Department (ex. Department of Sociology and Social Work)

  6. University (ex. University of Cape Coast)

    • Repeat for all authors

  7. Abstract

    • Include a 150-200 word abstract under the heading Abstract.

  8. Keywords

    • Include 3 to 5 keywords that best reflect the content of the manuscript under the heading Keywords

 

Peer Review Process:

The journal has a double-blind peer review process. For all submissions, other than book reviews, the author’s name will be removed from the submission during the review process, and the author will not be informed about who reviewed their submission. We will attempt to have at least two reviewers from the editorial board and/or volunteer external reviewers comment on the academic quality of the submission, and submit a review report to the author.

​Publication Timeline:

Siyabonana: The Journal of Africana Studies will publish an issue every winter, summer and fall. 

Call for Copy Editors

Siyabonana: The Journal of Africana Studies is an open access online peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes original research and creative intellectual work on key issues within the discipline of Africana Studies and across the global African world. We are currently in need of several service-oriented scholars, writers, and editors who can serve as copy editors.

Copy Editor's Role

As part of the final stages of the publishing process, copy editors will review and correct punctuation, spelling, and small grammar errors on select submissions. Copy editors will also review and correct citations to ensure that submissions have consistent and accurate formatting in accordance with either MLA, APA, or Chicago citation style.

Contact

If interested in serving as a copy editor, please email joafst@gmail.com.

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