Editors and Editorial Board Members

Keisha A. Brown (she/her)

Keisha A. Brown is an Assistant Professor of History at Tennessee State University in the Department of History, Political Science, Geography, and Africana Studies, and serves on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Africana Studies.  She graduated with her bachelor’s degree from the University of Notre Dame; earned her doctorate from the University of Southern California; in 2018–2019, was a postdoctoral fellow at the James Weldon Johnson Institute for the Study of Race and Difference at Emory University; and was a National Committee on U.S.-China Relations Public Intellectual fellow. Dr. Brown is an Asian Studies scholar with a regional focus on East Asia and specializing in modern Chinese history. Her research centers on Sino-Black relations and examines networks of difference in China used to understand the Black foreign other. In 2020, she co-founded the Black China Caucus, a non-profit organization dedicated to amplifying Black voices in the China space. 

Anthony S. Dandridge (he/him)

Anthony S. Dandridge is an academician in the Department of Black Studies at S.U.N.Y. New Paltz, and serves on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Africana Studies.  As an Africologist, his research and service interests, in part, include African and African American Philosophy, Sustainability, Mindfulness, and Afrofuturism. He is the current Vice Chair of the S.U.N.Y. Black Faculty and Staff Collective; Co-Founder of the Black Lives Matter @School at New Paltz; a Sustainability Faculty Fellow; and Co-Chair of the Faculty and Staff Contemplative Group.

K.T. Ewing (she/her)

K.T. Ewing is an Associate Professor of History at Tennessee State University. She is an alum of Xavier University in Louisiana, and a third generation HBCU graduate dedicated to preserving Black cultural and intellectual spaces. Her research interests include Black history, women and gender studies, sexuality, and the influence of blues culture in American society. Her current book project, Remember My Name: Alberta Hunter and the Two-Faced Archive, is a biography examining the life of Alberta Hunter, a twentieth-century blues and cabaret singer from Memphis, Tennessee. Ewing is a copy editor for The Journal of Africana Studies, and serves on the Editorial Board.

Aimee Glocke (she/her)

Aimee Glocke is an Associate Professor of Africana Studies at California State University, Northridge. She earned her M.A. in Afro-American Studies from UCLA; her Ph.D. in African American Studies from Temple University; and completed a Post Doc in African American and Diaspora Studies at the University of Wyoming. Her research areas include: African/Black Literature, African/Black History, African/Black Psychology, and African/Black Dance. Aimee was a member of the Editorial Board for the Journal of Pan African Studies (JPAS) and has published in The Encyclopedia of Black Studies; The Journal of Pan African Studies; Ofo: Journal of Transatlantic Studies; Overcoming Adversity: Stories from Generation X Faculty; The Huffington Post;  Diverse Issues in Higher Education; and co-edited The Journal of Pan African Studies’ Special Edition on African/Black Dance. She released a short documentary on the International Authentic Katherine Dunham Seminar, and serves as a Co-Editor of The Journal of Africana Studies.

Anthony Q. Hazard, Jr. (he/him)

Anthony Q. Hazard, Jr. is an Associate Professor in the Ethnic Studies Department with a courtesy appointment in the Department of History at Santa Clara University, and serves on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Africana Studies.  He majored in Psychology and African American Studies at Arizona State University, and completed his PhD in History at Temple University (2008). He is the author of Postwar Anti-Racism: The United States, Unesco, and “Race,” 1945-1968 (Palgrave 2012), and Boasians at War: Anthropology, Race, and World War II (Palgrave 2020). He has held the Postdoctoral Fellowship in Science in Human Culture at Northwestern University, and the Inclusive Excellence Postdoctoral Fellowship at Santa Clara University. His research interests include transnational US history, the history of anthropology, and race.

James L. Henry Jr. (he/him)

James L. Henry Jr. earned his bachelor’s degree in African American Studies in 1991 from California State University, Northridge (CSUN); his Interdisciplinary Master’s Degree in Educational Policy and Leadership and African American Studies in 1994 also from CSUN; and his Doctorate in Higher Educational Leadership in December of 2017. He holds a social science teaching credential, and has been an academic advisor with the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) for the past 25 years. He has taught courses at Los Angeles Valley College; Los Angeles Mission College; Los Angeles City College; Ventura College; and California State University, Northridge. His publications include: “The Impact of Utilizing a Strength Intervention to Improve Self-Efficacy in Low-Income First-Generation Students'' (2016); “The Education of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.” (1994); and “The Importance of Values” (1985). Henry serves on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Africana Studies.

Lawrence M. Jackson (he/him)

Lawrence M. Jackson (he/him) is an Associate Professor; serves as the Associate Chair of Dance; the Director of Graduate Studies in Dance; the Artistic Director of the Alabama Repertory Dance Theatre; Dance Alabama; and The MFA Dance Concert and Dance Collection within the Department of Theatre and Dance at the University of Alabama. Within the Dance program, Jackson teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in Jazz, Contemporary, Dance History, Pedagogy, Freshman Seminar, Improvisation and Choreography. In addition to his duties within the Department of Theatre and Dance, Jackson also serves the College of Arts and Sciences as Chair of the Diversity Committee and as a Distinguished Teaching Fellow. Jackson is also the current President of the Alabama Dance Council Executive Board. As a scholar, Jackson has published in scholarly journals in the field of Black Dance. Most notably, he authored, co-edited and published a special edition devoted to Black Dance in the Journal of Pan African Studies, the second occurrence in history, where an academic journal edition was committed solely to Black Dance. Lawrence is the recipient of the 2021 University of Alabama’s President’s Faculty Research Award for a Mid-Career Scholar, and serves as a Co-Editor of The Journal of Africana Studies.

DeReef F. Jamison (he/him)

DeReef F. Jamison is an Associate Professor of African American Studies at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, and serves on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Africana Studies.  He received a B.S. in Psychology from Bowie State University; a M.S. in Community Psychology from Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University; and a Ph.D. in African American Studies from Temple University. His research attempts to demonstrate the connections between Africana intellectual history and social science that are often seen as disconnected. In particular, he examines how historical figures in the Africana intellectual tradition explore the notion of cultural consciousness.  Jamison’s research interests include Africana intellectual history; the intellectual history and diasporic connections of Africana psychology; and the psychology of race and racism. He has published articles and essays in The Journal of African American Studies; The Journal of Black Studies; Race, Gender and Class; The Griot; Africology: The Journal of Pan African Studies; The Western Journal of Black Studies; The Journal of Black Psychology; and The Black Scholar.

Sheba Lo (she/her)

Sheba Lo is an Associate Professor in the Department of Africana Studies at California State University, Northridge, and serves as a Co-Editor of The Journal of Africana Studies. Sheba earned her bachelor’s degree in Africana Studies and her master’s degree in English: Teaching English as a Second Language from California State University, Dominguez Hills, and her Ph.D from Howard University in African Studies. Her research interests include West African, South African, and African American Literature (oral, written, and film), including Hip-Hop. Her scholarship highlights artists as agents of social change and political change throughout the African world. Dr. Lo is also interested in Black family sustainability with a particular emphasis on the well-being of Black women and children.

Anyabwile Love (he/him)

Anyabwile Love, Philadelphia native, is a husband and father of two children. He completed both his B.A. (Cum Laude) and M.A. in African American Studies at Temple University. He received his Ph.D. in Africana Studies from Temple University in May 2014. His dissertation, “Uninterrupted Conversations with Our Eegun: Preliminary Considerations for Methodological Approaches to the Research of African Music and the Music of John Coltrane” utilized the life and music of John Coltrane to create new approaches to the biographical research and writing of Black jazz musician. His current projects includes a book project on John Coltrane’s musical community in Philadelphia as well as a one man play centered on Coltrane’s seminal composition, A Love Supreme. Anyabwile is the founder and creator of The John Coltrane Symposium and owner of Bailey Street Books. Currently, Anyabwile  serves as Associate Editor for the literary journal A Gathering Together, and is an Assistant Professor of History at Community College of Philadelphia. He serves on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Africana Studies.

Sekhmet Ra Em Kht Maat (they/he)

Sekhmet Ra Em Kht Maat is an Assistant Professor of Africana Studies at Tennessee State University.  Maat earned a doctorate from the Department of Africology and African American Studies at Temple University, and serves as a Co-Editor of The Journal of Africana Studies. Publications in the area of Africana cosmology, religion and spiritual philosophy, African-centered theory, and Africana queer theory have appeared in Critical Sociology, Religions, and the Journal of Pan African Studies.  Maat is also the editor of A College Introduction to African-centered Theory: Readings in Africana Studies (Cognella).

Rebekkah Mulholland (she/they)

Rebekkah Mulholland is an Assistant Professor of African American History at California State University, Sacramento. Mulholland earned a doctorate from the Department of History at the University of Memphis. Mulholland's research focuses on transgender and queer studies, as well as on the history of race, gender, sexuality, class, and social movements in United States history. Mulholland wrote, directed, and produced a film series, “Civil Rights: Stories to Inspire Change,” for the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis. A recent publication of Gullah culture, Candomblé, and African syncretic religions can be found in the Oral History Journal. Mulholland serves as a Co-Editor of The Journal of Africana Studies.

Joshua M. Myers (he/him)

Joshua M. Myers (he/him) is an Associate Professor of Africana Studies in the Department of Afro-American Studies at Howard University, and serves on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Africana Studies.  He is the author of We Are Worth Fighting For: A History of the Howard University Student Protest of 1989 (NYU Press, 2019) and Cedric Robinson: The Time of the Black Radical Tradition (Polity, 2021), as well as the editor of A Gathering Together: Literary Journal.

Shelby Ray Pumphrey (she/her)

Shelby Ray Pumphrey is an Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Pan African Studies at the University of Louisville. She serves on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Africana Studies as the Book Review Editor.  Her  work focuses primarily on questions of race, gender and mental illness, but especially on Africana peoples' experiences with institutional mental healthcare in the United States during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. She earned a dual PhD in African American and African Studies (AAAS) and History from Michigan State University. Her current project focuses on the nation's first mental hospital established exclusively for the care of African Americans, Central Lunatic Asylum for the Colored Insane, with particular emphasis on Africana women and involuntary commitment during the final decades of the nineteenth century.

Andrea Ringer (she/her)

Andrea Ringer is an Assistant Professor of History at Tennessee State University. She holds graduate degrees in history and public history, and teaches courses on mass incarceration, Atlantic migration, the African Caribbean, and the African Diaspora. She also co-directs and directs several digital Black Studies projects at TSU that center on community productions of knowledge. Her scholarship uses a labor framework to critically examine global systems of capitalism. She has published on the history of capital punishment, prison privatization and the prisoners’ rights movement, and multispecies workplaces created and maintained by colonization. She serves as a Co-Editor of The Journal of Africana Studies.

Edward Onaci (he/him)

Edward Onaci is an Associate Professor of History and African American & Africana Studies at Ursinus College and serves on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Africana Studies.  His book Free The Land: The Republic of New Afrika and the Pursuit of a Black Nation-State was released in 2020 with University of North Carolina Press. It is the first full history of the New Afrikan Independence Movement. 

Danielle Wallace (she/her)

Danielle Wallace is an Associate Professor of Africana-World Studies in the Department of Community and Social Justice Studies at William Paterson University, and is a member of the Editorial Board of The Journal of Africana Studies.  She also serves as the coordinator of the William Paterson University Social Justice Project, a pedagogical resource for faculty teaching courses on race, gender, and sexuality. Dr. Wallace’s research interests include the Black family; gender and sexual politics in the Black community; the gender socialization of Black men and women; and the socio-political roots of Africana Studies.  Her current scholarship and publications are focused on Black student activism and Black male/female relationships, especially the dating, marriage, and mate selection ideals of Black men and women. Dr. Wallace holds a BA in Black Studies from the State University of New York College at New Paltz, and an MA and Ph.D. in African American Studies from Temple University.

Learotha Williams, Jr. (he/him)

Learotha Williams, Jr. is a scholar of African American, Civil War and  Reconstruction,  and Public History at Tennessee State University in Nashville, Tennessee. At TSU, he coordinates the North Nashville Heritage Project, an effort that seeks to encourage a greater understanding of the history of North Nashville, including, but not limited to, Jefferson Street and its historic relationship to the greater Nashville community.  Williams is also on the advisory council of the Harriet Tubman Center for the Study of Freedom and Equity at SUNY Binghamton. His most recent publications are I'll Take You There: Exploring Nashville’s Social Justice Sites (Vanderbilt University Press, 2021) and “A Balm in Gilead:  Love, Hope, and Despair in North Nashville” in Murals of North Nashville (Vanderbilt University Press, 2019).  Williams is a native of Tallahassee, Florida, where  he earned his doctorate in history from Florida State University in 2003. He serves on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Africana Studies. 

Council of Elders Advisory Board

Greg Carr (he/him)

Greg Carr is First Vice President of the Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations and Editor of The Compass: The Journal of ASCAC.  He is also an Associate Professor of Afro-American Studies and Adjunct Professor of Law at Howard University. A former board member of the National Council
for Black Studies, he has twice been named “HBCU Male Faculty Member of the Year” by HBCU Digest. Carr led the team that designed the Africana Studies curriculum framework for Philadelphia’s mandatory high school African American History course and is co-founder and Scholar-in-Residence of Philadelphia Freedom Schools. His published scholarship has appeared in both academic and popular publications and he is a commentator in a wide range of print, electronic and social media. A weekly panelist on the Black Star Network's “Roland Martin Unfiltered," he is the co-creator with Karen Hunter of “In Class With Carr" and "Office Hours with Dr. Greg Carr" at www.knarrative.com and on YouTube. He tweets at @AfricanaCarr and blogs at drgregcarr.com.

David L. Horne (he/him)

David L. Horne is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Africana Studies at California State University, Northridge. He earned his B.A in Psychology from the University of Florida in 1969; his M.P.A. (Public Policy and Public Budgeting) from CSU, San Bernardino in 1983; his M.A. in History from University of Florida in 1973; and his Ph.D. in History (and Political Economy) from UCLA in 1984. He was a continuing Editor for the Journal of African Studies and Journal of Pan African Studies from 1999 to 2007. A few of his publications include: “21ST Century Pan Africanism: A Re-Definition,” in Proceedings From the Lagos Conference—Pan Africanism, 2005 and Beyond, (ed.) Duro Oni in 2006; Straight To the Point: A Logical Introduction to Critical Thinking, Pearson Press in 2005; “Shared Governance at Compton College: A Model for the State Community Colleges in California,” in The Association of Management Journal, Fall, 1992; "Theories, Methods and Paradigms in Africentricity: A Critique," in JPAS, Vol 1, 1, 1998-99; “Passing the Baton: The Nyerere Legacy in Tanzania,” in JAS in Spring 1988; and “The Sixth Pan African Congress: A Positive View,” in The Black Scholar in Fall 1974.

Nathaniel Norment, Jr. (he/him)

Nathaniel Norment, Jr. is Professor Emeritus in the Department of English at The City College of New York and the Department of African American Studies at Temple University. He is the former Chair of African American Studies at Temple University where he taught undergraduate and graduate courses in African American Studies and African American literature and culture. He was the Director of The Center for African American Research and Public Policy (at Temple) where research focused on four areas affecting African Americans: criminal justice, economic development, education, and health. His publications include The African American Studies Reader (Carolina Academic Press, 2001, 2nd Edition 2007); Readings in African American Language: Aspects, Features and Perspectives-Volume 1 2003 and Volume 2 2005 (Peter Lang Publishers); The Addison Gayle, Jr. Reader (University of Illinois Press 2009); and African American Studies: The Discipline and its Dimensions (Carolina Academic Press). He has articles published in the College Language Association Journal; the Journal of Basic Writing; the Journal of Chinese Language Teachers Association; the Journal of Black Studies; and the Language Quarterly. Norment earned his B.S. at Ball State University; his M.S. at Saint Francis University; and his Ph.D. at Fordham University.

Karin Stanford (she/her)

Karin Stanford is a Professor of Political Science and Africana Studies at California State University, Northridge. She earned a Doctorate of Philosophy in Political Science from Howard University, and specializes in African American Politics and International Relations. After graduating from Howard University, Dr. Stanford received a two-year Post-Doctoral Fellowship from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and later served as a Congressional Black Caucus Fellow under Congressman Sanford Bishop of Georgia. In 2010, she was elected to Chair the Pan African Studies Department at CSUN and served in that position until Fall of 2013 when he became the Associate Dean of Humanities. Recognizing the importance of health equity, Dr. Stanford has integrated health equity into her research and community work. She published a groundbreaking book, Breaking the Silence: Inspirational Stories of Black Cancer Survivors (Hilton Publishing) which highlights disease prevention, treatment options, and inequality in health care. She serves on the advisory board of the California Black Women’s Health Project, and has served as a consumer reviewer for the Department of Defense, U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command, Congressional Directed Medical Research Programs. As a consumer reviewer, Dr. Stanford has reviewed more than 60 scientific proposals on breast cancer research.